Honey – Uses, Side Effects, and More

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-738/honey

This WebMD article talks about the uses and affects of honey in both homeopathic and medical situations. Historically we have been told not to use honey with newborns. The information here seems to contradict this advice. Ask your pediatrician about the use of honey with you little ones. Honey is good for so many situations I suggest you speak with your OB (Obstetrician) if you have any questions about using honey during pregnancy. Throughout these suggestions we are given reactions and positive uses for honey for adults. Children and infants are really not thoroughly discussed. Do some research on the subject before introducing honey to your little ones. Better safe than sorry. JUDY

Possibly Effective for 

  • Burns. Applying honey preparations directly to burns seems to improve healing.
  • CoughTaking a small amount of honey by mouth at bedtime appears to reduce coughing spells in children aged 2 years and older. Honey appears to be at least as effective as the cough medicinedextromethorphan. But it is not clear if honey reduces cough in adults. 
  • Foot sores in people with diabetes. Applying dressings containing honey to diabetic foot ulcers seems to reduce healing time and prevent the need for antibiotics
  • Dry eye. Using specific honey eye drops or eye gel in the eyes (Optimel Manuka plus eye drops or Optimel Antibacterial Manuka Eye Gel) helps to make dry eyes feel better. These products can be used along with regular dry eye treatment such as lubricant drops and warm cloths on the eyes.
  • Sores and ulcers of the mouth and gums caused by herpes virus (herpetic gingivostomatitis). Rinsing the mouth and then slowly swallowing honey helps these sores and ulcers heal faster in children who are taking a medication called acyclovir.

Special Precautions and Warnings 

When taken by mouth: Honey is likely safe for most adults. But when honey is produced from the nectar of rhododendrons, it is likely unsafe. This type of honey contains a toxin that may cause heart problems, low blood pressure, and chest pain.

When applied to the skin or on the inside of the mouth: Honey is likely safe for most adults.

When applied into the eye: It is possibly safe to use specific eye drops containing manuka honey (Optimel Manuka Plus Eye Drops; Melcare, Biomedical Pty Ltd). These eye drops are usually applied into the eyes 2-3 times daily for up to 4 weeks.

When applied into the nose: Diluted manuka honey solution is possibly safe for most adults when sprayed into the nose for up to 2 weeks.  Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Honey is likely safe when taken in food amounts. But there isn’t enough reliable information to know if it is safe to use honey in medicinal amounts when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to the amounts found in foods.

Interactions ? 

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with HONEY Honey might slow blood clotting. Taking honey along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.
  • Phenytoin (Dilantin) interacts with HONEY Honey might increase how much phenytoin the body absorbs. Taking honey along with phenytoin might increase the effects and side effects of phenytoin.
  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with HONEY Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Honey might change how quickly the liver breaks down these medications. This could change the effects and side effects of these medications.

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